Author Archives: Marketing

MEMS integration: A Matter of Perspective

by Stephen Breit, V.P. Engineering, Coventor, Inc.

MEMS integration means different things to different audiences. To pioneers in the MEMS industry, integration may imply a monolithic fabrication process, in which the MEMS and accompanying CMOS electronics are fabricated on the same die. As suppliers of MEMS design automation software to the MEMS industry, Coventor sees integration more broadly as the work of combining MEMS with CMOS electronics, whether in a monolithic process, as separate die in the same package, or even in separate packages. And integration encompasses packaging effects on the MEMS as well. The electronics are analog/mixed-signal (A/MS) circuits that provide electrical input to the MEMS and perform A/D conversion on its output. Such circuits are designed and simulated at a high level of abstraction with MATLAB and Simulink, and at lower levels of abstraction with EDA software such as the Cadence Virtuoso suite. MEMS designers, therefore, must deliver models of their designs that are compatible with the tools of choice for electronics design. Coventor has been focusing on addressing this integration challenge for a number of years.

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MEMS Integration Challenges, Today and Tomorrow

By Stephen Breit, Coventor, Inc.
EE Catalog

As MEMS component suppliers compete to offer more functionality in their components, companies will be driven to adopt a MEMS design-automation platform that can most efficiently integrate multiple technologies.

MEMS integration means different things to different audiences. To pioneers in the MEMS industry, integration may imply a monolithic fabrication process, in which the MEMS and accompanying CMOS electronics are fabricated on the same die. MEMS design automation software suppliers have a broader view of integration, one the includes combining MEMS with CMOS electronics, whether in a monolithic process, as separate die in the same package, or even in separate packages. And integration encompasses packaging effects on the MEMS as well. The electronics are analog/mixed-signal (A/MS) circuits that provide electrical input to the MEMS and perform A/D conversion on its output. Such circuits are designed and simulated at a high level of abstraction with tools such as MATLAB and Simulink, and at lower levels of abstraction with EDA software such as the Cadence Virtuoso suite. MEMS designers, therefore, must deliver models of their designs that are compatible with the tools of choice for electronics design. The integration challenge is a major focus throughout the MEMS ecosystem.

Coventor’s Stephen Breit Highlighted as Featured Speaker at MEPTEC MEMS Symposium

Coventor’s Stephen Breit will be one of the featured speakers at the upcoming MEPTEC MEMS Technology Symposium.  Dr. Breit, who is V.P. of Engineering at Coventor,  will speak about realizing the full potential of MEMS design automation software.  It’s a topic he knows quite a bit about as he has headed up the research and development of Coventor’s market-leading MEMS design software solutions for the past 15 years. Steve will draw upon that experience to make the case for engineers to use increased software-based automation and simulation tools in order to reduce time-consuming and costly build-and-test cycles.

The tenth annual MEMS Technology Symposium is being held in San Jose, California on May 23, 2012.  To celebrate a decade of success, this year’s discussions will be focused on how to jumpstart the next decade with a bold prediction: to grow the MEMS market to $1 trillion USD. read more…

The Value of Time

– Trip report from SEMICON MEMS Forum in Singapore by Tom Flynn, Vice President of Sales and Business Development at Coventor

It was an honor to participate in the MEMS Forum sponsored by SEMI and A-Star Institute of Microelectronics.   Coventor had the pleasure of sharing the stage with founding members of innovative MEMS start-up companies, CEO’s of successful MEMS corporations, R&D veterans whose perspective spans decades, and leading figures from large scale commercial foundries and specialized equipment vendors.

Time is free, but it’s priceless.  You can’t own it, but you can use it.   You can’t keep it but you can spend it.  Once you’ve lost it you can never get it back.

The most common theme among the participants was the value of time and the need to bring new MEMS devices to market within timeframes that are vastly different from the past.    Many of the speakers referred to industry growth charts which highlighted the impact of consumer adoption of MEMS and the changes that has brought to our industry.

Mr. Gregory Galvin, CEO of Kionix, reminded us that the adoption of MEMS in consumer markets is relatively new.  “It was IBM Thinkpad’s, in 2003, that first included MEMS devices for drop detection” (to protect the hard drives).   Seagate, Samsung, the Nintendo (with its groundbreaking Wii) and the Apple iPhone all followed, ushering in a new era for MEMS, an era when time to market has become critical.”  When asked about the value of time to market, Mr. Galvin, answered that “I have that conversation (time to market) daily with my CTO”.  He added that “while the technical challenges are great, the challenges associated with making money in MEMS are even more difficult”.

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MEMS market is Exploding – Are you Ready for the Challenges of Consumerization?

Revenue growth for MEMS is expected to be nothing short of explosive according to industry analysts and recent press reports. Jérémie Bouchaud, director and principal MEMS and sensors analyst for IHS says that this growth is driven by the fact that new MEMS are at the heart of today’s most exciting and fast-growing electronic products, from motion controlled video games, to tablet navigation systems, to tiny projectors embedded in smart phones. He predicts that by 2014, new MEMS will generate revenue of $1.4 billion.

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Simulating the Whole Process

By Bryon Moyer
EE Journal

Back when discussion CMOS-compatible MEMS, I briefly mentioned a couple tools from Coventor that are used in MEMS design. But one of them actually has use for any semiconductor process. You might think it’s another TCAD tool, but actually, it isn’t. read more…

EDA Tool Aims at 10-Nanometer 3-D

By Colin Johnson
Electronic Engineering Times

Reaching the advanced semiconductor process nodes at 22-nanometer and beyond requires accurate three-dimensional (3-D) models of the proposed physical structures to obviate the need for repeated trial-and-error design cycles. In fact, the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors has designated modeling 3D physical structures as a “grand challenge” at advanced processing nodes.

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Coventor’s SEMulator3D 2012 Software Release Increases Speed and Accuracy of MEMS and Semicondutor Process Development

64-bit support with performance and ease of use enhancements focus on process modeling and integration challenges at 28nm and beyond

 CARY, North Carolina – April 9, 2012Coventor®, Inc., the leading supplier of virtual fabrication solutions for micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and semiconductor devices, today announced immediate availability of the latest release of itsSEMulator3D® software. SEMulator3D 2012 raises the bar for predictive process modeling tools with increased capacity, speed and automation advancements to accelerate development of leading-edge process technology nodes.

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